Developers Cagematch! Round 2: Corona vs. Marmalade

After the surprising success of the first Developers Cagematch!, for a while I had planned to do another round with a different set of programs, and then of course life happened. Today, I’m proud to announce that the second set of this series is finally here, and we’ll be looking at two popular and powerful Lua-based programs, Corona and Marmalade.

I was introduced to Lua during my graduate studies, as an alternative to coding for mobile games. For a strange reason, my courses were very invested into Flash and ActionScript despite its criticisms even at its time. While I still prefer it for animations and light games, even in its heyday, for anything else that Flash was used for, I heavily disliked it. I’m sorry, but Flash websites are not practical, not secure, and are a sign of its time. However, if you still want to get your feet wet and want to practice OOP, especially in games, I won’t stop you whether or not you want to use AS2 or 3.

But, if you want to start playing outside of the little leagues, Lua is a good place to start. As a simplified C language, it is cross-platform and a simple way to really look at how most modern applications, games, and other software are structured. Unfortunately, while I have only really used it for prototypes, I still do advise it as a good way to build your prototype, in case you’re really not keen on using something like HTML5 (which I really recommend as the king of simple prototyping, but again this is all preference).

However, don’t let this learning curve stop you. Lua is also capable of making powerful apps and games, and while by itself can make simple and fun apps, it works best with other languages talking to it. (Hence it is cross-platform, so no figure you will also see some C languages thrown in to help boost up Lua. Think of it like the Megazord from Power Rangers.) For the sake of this cagematch, while I will point to this fact, I’ll only be referring to Lua itself, plain and tall.


Corona is a lightweight SDK suitable for the mobile and tablet environment, and a program that was released for Android builds on PC right around when I entered my graduate courses, so it felt incredibly exciting to use such a cutting-edge software. The interface for Corona is very simple, and the tutorials and documentation demonstrate the program’s ability to tap into the features of smartphones and tablets. The program also has access to third-party API’s, enabling even more customization and other bells and whistles you can put into your projects.

Programming in Corona however, is a little different compared to using other means to code Lua. Some of the functions are library-specific to the software only, so if you were to do the same function in Marmalade or another program for example, check with the documentation for how it needs to be coded or else you will get errors. This is something to keep in mind if you plan to use an alternative Lua program in the future, but if your heart is set on Corona for life, you have nothing to worry. (Unlike AS2/3, the differences are minor in comparison and is only a matter of semantics, not the actual coding structure.)

You’re probably wondering why Corona would do such a thing, and until you realize how certain functions behave in other versions of Lua software versus Corona, you’ll realize in the long-run, Corona is more organized in terms of how the programmer can execute their code to do what they want to be done. As any programmer knows, organized code is efficient code, and will hog less resources on the device being used. (This isn’t to say Marmalade is not an efficient program, just that it’s a bit of another animal, but I will explain soon.)

At the time of writing this, the licenses have changed from what I had used originally. CoronaSDK formerly was split into two different types of licenses (one for Mac, one for PC), and could only output to those respective device families, for an annual fee. Now the SDK can output to both OS regardless of which you have, and can output to all types of devices, whether they’re iOS, Kindle, or Android. They also have monthly fees which follow the Unity model – Free, Small Business for $79/month, (mainly for revenues up to $500k), and Enterprise for $129/month (no revenue limit).


As you may have figured, whereas Corona originated in the States, Marmalade is from the UK. It’s also an award-winning program, and while this was outputting to a variety of platforms earlier than Corona was, it also has a level of sophistication that enables it to implement a wider variety of API’s built-in, including support to Objective C and OpenGL, and even includes a plug-in for use with Autodesk 3DS Max and Maya. If Lua is a language meant to be played with others, this is practically the playground that comes with it.

Of course, with great power comes great responsibility. For the average joe programmer getting into Lua, Marmalade has a higher learning curve than Corona does, and it can be overwhelming if you’re not used to seeing or working around all of these functionalities. (I know I was.) While Marmalade’s tutorials and documentation are fantastic, and its interface dazzling and dashing, there were many times I would stare at my screen and grumble to myself “can’t I just code?”. Maybe I was too used to Corona’s handholding and simplicity of things, but while more experience programmers would wet their pants over the oodles of goodies Marmalade has to offer, I just want what’s needed to work, and I want it to work well. The more I worked with Marmalade, the more I felt like a resource manager and not a programmer.

However, if you’re a person of greater talents than myself and want the extra mile, Marmalade has reasonable pricing, with the higher bills obviously meant for larger companies needing multiple licenses. Average joe programmer can easily get away with a Free license with no trouble, or for $15/month upgrade to Community for a little more customization. Everything else from Indie onward ($499 annual and up) open up even more platform and other treats to enjoy. Unlike Corona, Marmalade from the get-go can be used for developing for Windows Phone/Store/10, Tizen, and Blackberry, so keep that in mind if you’re looking to do more outside of good old iOS/Android.


Sorry, folks. The answer is as subjective as my experiences using these programs. Both hold many strengths and weaknesses, but simply picking one over the other is like choosing apples over oranges. (Both of them are fruit, which means they’re delicious and good for you!)

If you want to just get started and code, Corona is what you’re looking for. Now with the ability to export to iOS and Android, coupled with an efficient library, and hundreds of API’s out of the box, it’s just a no-brainer.

However, if you wanna be with the big boys (and girls), dive right into some Marmalade. Not only would you be able to export to a variety of mobile and tablet platforms, if you upgrade to an Indie license you can basically put yourself all over the digital map! If you’re not afraid to learn a few new languages all in one go, and want the challenge, you will be rewarded generously.

While Lua is taking a backseat in the current atmosphere of mobile/tablets, with its cousin C languages and others such as Java and native taking reign, it’s still a lovely language to learn, especially for beginner/intermediate coders. Compared to others, it feels more intuitive thanks to its lighter syntax, which means you will see results quickly, but keep in mind that similar to Python and AS3, cAsE sEnSiTiViTy is an issue so be careful! Both programs host fantastic documentation and tutorials from other helpful developers, so if you’re in a bind usually you will be able to find yourself out of that jam soon enough.

Happy coding, and Happy Thanksgiving!

Switching gears (aka Help I’ve Fallen Into Excel Spreadsheets and I Can’t Get Up!)

Now that October is drawing to its exciting close to a busy month, I can sit down and explain some exciting progress going on in between work and play. Earlier last month you may have recalled me mentioning my first convention panel at New York Comic-Con 2015, and the review about it can be seen at my Etsy blog. That aside, I’ve been busy being good friends with Microsoft Excel and typing up numerous spreadsheets (with more on the way! My head hurts from all this math but it will be worth the work!). Why, you ask?

Well, it’s not for my visual novel. Actually, that project has now folded into its sister project, and together the two will finally see their revamped adaptations into video game form! Many, many years ago (11 to be exact), I had a webcomic. It was around characters my friends and I created, doing random stuff, and maybe only had a total readership of 10 fans but it was fun while it lasted. Towards the end we decided to take our fun into fantasy RPG form, and while its novel is a disaster, it was a way for us to develop worlds and characters. Looking back now, it is a guilty read. It’s so bad that it’s good! You may have seen some of my art for it on my deviantArt way back.

As I was working more on the visual novel, things just did not make sense, and as I was fitting pieces back into this other story, the more I wanted to return to this other world and really put some TLC in it. So here we are now, a strategy RPG to be built in Unity2D! Since a ton of past material already was provided in the books, it was only a matter of updating the characters and available classes the player can use, and the rest of the mechanics fell into place. Much of the story is intact, but just some things polished and tightened up. Yes, the game will have an official name soon too! I’m in the process of weeding through possible titles to see what is best (and hasn’t been claimed yet so it will pop up easier on a Google search).


Concept sketch of the original intro from 2008.

“In the land of Ceres, the kingdom is on the brink of disaster from relentless waves of undead monsters, led by a mysterious man and his group of bandits. A young girl named Gwendolyn steps up as a new commander, driven to take back her country – but she’ll soon learn that not everything is as it seems. Travel the land, encounter a variety of colorful characters and heroes, and discover the secrets of Ceres.”

I’ll have a jazzier description in the future, don’t worry. Gameplay will be similar to Fire Emblem and Chrono Trigger, with RPG roots akin with Dungeons & Dragons and Pathfinder. The mechanics will be simplified so even beginner players in the genre can get into it easily, which will leave room for lots of customizations for your characters. Despite the serious undertones to the story, there will be a lot of humor thrown in too, especially as your party really is just a bunch of misfits trying to do their part. So aside from strategy there is emphasis of teamwork within your crew. (Which any leader knows goes hand-in-hand in any project or mission.)

Development-wise, I aim to have a demo level completed within the next couple of months. I’m still pondering if I do want voiceovers or not, or just have them for the intro sequence. As of art direction, I keep going back to more of a painterly, lineless look, which Vanillaware is famous for (as seen in Odin Sphere, GrimGrimoire). This new project’s look may not be as sharp and glossy, but I want this game to have as much whimsy as the characters in it. Retro pixel art has been done so much that it’s almost become old again, and anything too cell-shaded would be too harsh on the eyes, considering a lot of information will be laid out on the grid. That aside, the artwork will be the same as previously planned.

Despite Odin Sphere nearing almost 10 years old now, thanks to its mechanics, story, and art style, it hasn’t aged a day.

Outside of upcoming game progress, I’ve noticed lately that my blog post on Construct2 vs. Ren’py is getting pageviews again, and now that I’ve worked enough in Corona and Marmalade, I think it’s time I start on my next Developers Cagematch entry on that. I’m happy a lot of people have found the other post so useful! It means a lot to me.

Until then, have a Happy Halloween and brush your teeth after eating all that candy!

Updated download links for my games

I realized the links I was using originally for my games are no longer active (they pointed to the gamejams I entered them in). Since the blog posts and post-mortems usually are the first things people see here, I went ahead and put in the Dropbox links on those. For quick reference, here is Compendium (Quest is required to play) and This Game is Not a Dating Sim (installer package).

Thanks and have fun!

Scratch it Up!

Hello everyone! I have a few updates worth mentioning, though I can’t run an actual announcement of one for a little while longer since details are still being worked on. I am happy to say however, that my game design classes at my library have been going very well, and this Fall we’re switching over to Scratch for a change! I was surprised by how well the kids took on Flash, but it’s a program that’s not without its faults, especially its usage and criticism by other developers and web browsers the past few years. Seeing that Scratch adapts better to the modern web, and also has an incredibly simple and fun interface (complete with neat documentation), I decided it was time to make the switch too.

I went ahead and did a test project last night to also brush up on my skills, and it was so much fun that I plan to do more cute little animations in the future. I used to do some with Flash in the past, but this was way simpler to set up and get going. Hopefully the kids enjoy it too!


As you can see, I’m excited about Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer towards the end of the month.

As of the visual novel, a lot of things are in the works of being switched around again, the biggest thing not only being the plot and its source, but also the game engine I want to use. Until things can be ironed out, I ask that any inquiries on collaborations be put on hold. Thank you!

Fisher Price: My First Convention Panel

I apologize for the wait between my last post regarding some news on New York Comic-Con, but I’m glad I waited it out because I have an exciting announcement after all! Originally, I had submitted a panel under my county’s library association and while it didn’t get picked by Reed Pop, last week I was asked to fill in for a panelist on a cosplay and libraries panel that did make it in. I usually do game design at my library, but as some of you may know I am a longtime cosplayer, and was more than happy to assist in this amazing opportunity! My first convention panel! The news is still sinking in.

Since the panel is on cosplay, my review on the experience will be at my Etsy blog when the time comes, but I will still link to it for those that are curious.

As of gamedev news, I’m migrating to Scratch for my next crop of game design classes, and when I am able to enter in gamejams again, I’m also considering using it as my engine the next time around. I always wanted to make a word game. I’m a sucker for Text Twist and other scramblers.

Visual Novel Book I available on PDF!

Well, sort-of the visual novel. It’s the first book on the series I will be adapting towards the project, so if you’re curious on some backstory or are looking for more info to help your decision on collaborating, the PDF is now available on Dropbox(link updated as of 10/6/15) Feel free to share the link but please follow the disclaimer in the beginning! Otherwise, happy reading!

Book II and the light novel chapters will also be next. III was never put on my deviantArt in the first place, so there won’t be a PDF of that. (Honestly it also had no conclusive ending, so…)

In the mean time, I might have an exciting announcement next week regarding New York Comic-Con. Just waiting on some news to get back to me. If anything else, I will at least have some post-con coverage of LI-Con2 since I’m returning there again this year to sell some goodies. My inventory has changed around so please look at my Etsy so you have a good idea of what will be offered! Thanks!

Have a happy (and early) 4th!

Decided to pop in another minor update since I realized I never mentioned it the other day when I posted. The visual novel’s script has undergone a small revision, but otherwise it will remain the final one it looks like. (Knock on wood! This thing only had to be fixed 5 times now haha!) I also went ahead to finalize my game design document for it as well, which really is only a list of the order of events and how the puzzle mechanics work. Sacrificing quality of the story for the sake of adding more interaction was what led to so many revisions the last time, so this time I planned for simpler mechanics that can be realistically programmed, that way you fine folks can enjoy the story and follow along better without too many jumps.

Now that the story spans between two generations and will pop in flashbacks several times, I want to have things explained coherently. Despite the fact that I’m not fond of its battle system, I keep recalling how Final Fantasy VIII handles this since the story will also behave similarly. (Minus the spiritual body possession oddity) In VIII technically there are two protagonists you play through – Squall Leonhart and Laguna Loire, the latter’s events taking place a generation prior to the other. By the story jumping back and forth to explain the story of the game, you get a better understanding of the characters’ world and what has to be done to make things right. Since my books were written in third-person, the narration will simply just switch to whichever character you’re guiding next, and there will be cues to hint this (audio, visual, or both). Like the puzzles in the game’s story, the characters themselves are also puzzles.

Besides all of that, as announced from my deviantArt back in May, I am still in the process of moving the books to Dropbox as .pdf files, since I’ll be closing my account there once the move is complete. Unfortunately, copying text over screwed up its formatting, and saving everything out to the site’s default bare-bones HTML honestly made everything look worse. I am happy to say that Book I is almost done at least, and formatting has helped to cut down the total number of pages as well. I also am in the process of printing them as book draft copies for bookkeeping purposes, as well as physical reference. At most there will only be 10 copies for the print runs, and they will only be loaned to individuals who are involved with the project.

I’m gonna cut off here since I feel like I’m just rambling at this point. Stay safe and have a Happy 4th of July!

Popping in an update

Hello everyone! I apologize for the lack of updates here. I’ve been busy preparing for some events in the summer, so gamedev has been on the backburner until most of it is out of the way. I am happy to announce however, that I’ll be attending New York Comic-Con on Thursday kudos to a Professional pass from my employer. I look forward to the awesome panels and seeing some old friends that day, and since my panels are in the morning, I will also be sneaking in a cosplay for the afternoon.

Hopefully I will have more to report when that comes around, but for now that’s all I can say :). Hope everyone is doing well, and stay cool this summer!

Reached 20 follows!

I’ve been meaning to post about this the other day, but I wanted to set aside some time to thank people for following this blog and its crazy adventures in the world of indiedev. When I dusted off this former art review blog from my undergrad years, I was unsure of how well it would do or if any other indies even used this place still. I’m happy to see that people still use places like Blogspot and WordPress for their devlogs, hobby blogs, or even businesses, and since even moving my own Etsy shop blog over to here now, I can happily say I never regretted the switch!

I’ll also take this time to give a tiny update on the blog here. I switched around some of the widgets at the left so navigating or finding things made more sense. You can now search any topics that I may have covered, or simply find them in the cloud-style tags. Besides my regular classic navigation on the top bar, you can also choose to select the bigger ones under the Categories section.

Thank you all again for your support!

New Etsy blog coming soon!

As some of you might remember (or maybe even know, I’m not sure), I run an Etsy shop and lately I’ve also been selling at local conventions at artist alleys. My blog for it has moved sites a few times, but today I finally decided that WordPress should be its home. I’m so surprised by how well this blog has done for my gamedev journeys, and I know crafters and other shopkeepers alike also use WordPress a lot also.

Feel free to follow the new blog in the mean time, but it won’t be completely ready for business until the end of the month. Like some of my other outlets like Pinterest and Instagram, not only will it be dedicated to updates regarding my Etsy and new shop items, but it will feature works in progress of projects (both personal and for the shop), and even some free tutorials if you’re an adventurious DIY-er like I am! If you’re worried if this blog will wither into the wind, don’t worry, this will still be maintained for my gamedev like normal.


Ironically, this announcement also comes in minutes after one of my local conventions officially announced me for their Dealer’s Room again! I’m so excited! It’s a fantastic convention run by the same hard-working folks as one of our larger ones here on Long Island, and I had a great time at this smaller one that opened last year. If you’re in the Long Island, NY area, please stop by this con in the summertime and say hi!