Switched to Trelby!

Also known as “Developers Cagematch II: I’m Finally Using an Actual Screenwriting Editor”!

Everyone has had their fair share of battles with Microsoft Word, myself included. It’s fantastic for essays and basic stuff, but anything requiring some type of formatting and you’re out of luck. While the thought of using it for dialogue scripting might make some of you scream and rip your hair out (and then wonder why on earth I used it for as long as I did), scripting for games factors in a little more than that. There technically is no industry standard for scripting for games. Some brave individuals stick to Microsoft Word, OpenOffice, etc., and tough it out because they see no fuss in getting a separate program just for writing scripts. Others like to follow the television and movie model, and settle down to such a commitment for the sake of focusing on writing and not readjusting the format every other minute so things are still legible.

Even in that school, others give basic descriptions of what’s going on in the scene and prefer to focus strictly on their characters (this is very true for if you have voice actors, as they won’t really care much for your cute field notes). And then others pretty much write the equivalent of a novel a-la Alan Moore, and that’s when I come knocking at their house and scream “JUST MAKE IT A BOOK JEEZ” while I furiously shake them but hey I won’t judge that’s totally cool too.

Since my scripts also have developer notes for changing assets and effects within the game, my stuff gets messy real fast. For my visual novel, since I’ll be asking for the help of others to voice some characters, this was not gonna fly. I needed something to help keep things nice and formatted so others can read what pertained to them, while allowing me to add in my notes so I didn’t have to write two separate scripts and waste more time.

Adobe offers a newer software to its critically-acclaimed repertoire called Adobe Story, but it requires a subscription (surprise!). I’m not necessarily a professional screenwriter, so I’m not sure on the justifications of paying for it since it seems to do things other screenwriting software have already. So my alternative was open-source, Trelby in specific.

Bottom line: Trelby is amazing, and now you know why this wasn’t a Developer’s Cagematch article (my heavy bias aside). For those new to Trelby, let alone to the world of screenwriting, this neat editor not only keeps things tidy and automatically paginates, it exports to PDF in a breeze, recommends a legible Courier typeface and why, compares other versions and rewrites of your scripts, and has a name database of over 200,000 names from various countries all over the world. The latter is nifty for giving poor NPC #16 an actual name, for example.

Also for you Mac devs out there, Trelby is still looking for someone to help out with porting the software for that OS. So if you love Trelby and want to pitch in, help a brother out!

Nerding aside, I’ve continued with the script for my game, and am about a thirdway into the prologue/tutorial level. I’m always on the lookout for voice actors, so contact me if you’d be interested! I’m also considering running a small e-mail “newsletter” for updates to anyone who wants to help out, so that way you’d be the first to know on project updates (especially if they’re not large enough to go to press here). I figure it would be helpful for people who have contacted me outside of my network circle specifically, and don’t want to be left hanging. I haven’t forgotten, don’t worry!

For you gamedevs out there, what do you use for writing your scripts?